Employment for Teens

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Teen smiling at work with business man in the backgroundFinding a job takes work

Working can provide you with independence, confidence, new friends, and money.  It is important to feel safe and supported in your job, and find the right job for you and your abilities.  The process of getting your first job or volunteer work with little or no experience will take some planning, learning, and patience.

The Basics of Finding a Job: Circle with the quote: It's not just about a job, it's about dignity. It's not just about a paycheck. It's about pride. It's not just about opportunity, it's about respect. -Joe Biden

  • Decide what types of jobs interest you: What types of skills and experience do you have? What are your interests? What new skills would you like to learn?
  • Use the Where Are You Going Guide from Washington State: It is full of questions, guidance and self tests to help you identify your interests and skills, and match them with careers, education or training.
  • Narrow down the specifics for your job hunt: How far are you willing to travel? How will you get to and from your job? What hours are you available to work?
  • Search outside the box: Look into volunteer opportunities, internships, or start your own small business. Let friends, family members, teachers, and neighbors know you are looking for a job and ask for their help. Use the internet to search out available resources in your area. Visit How to do a Job Search from Kids as Self Advocates.
  • When filling out applications: Prepare a simple resume even if you think you don’t have experience. List your skills and responsibilities, even if it’s only chores you do at home such as mowing the lawn or babysitting. Highlight how your skills will meet the needs of your prospective employers. Have references available.
  • Prepare for a job interview: Practice how you might respond to interview questions with friends and family. Find out as much as you can about your prospective employer. Look professional for the interview.

Volunteering:

  • Build your resume: Often employers count volunteer experience as work experience. It can be fun and helps you develop good skills, experience and references.
  • Find job opportunities: Volunteering can help show people what you can do and that you can do it well. If you impress them, you may be the first to hear of a job opening. You have a higher chance of getting it because people already know you.
  • Learn more about your interests: Find an organization that interests you. Internships and volunteering allow you to learn what you like and don’t like in a job. It can help you narrow down the right fit for you.

Resource: Kids as Self Advocates

National Resources for Teens with Special Needs:

Washington State-Specific Resources for Teens with Special Needs: